Essay On Who Fired First At Lexington And Concord

Essay On Who Fired First At Lexington And Concord-40
Gage's plan was to avoid conflict by removing military supplies from Whig militias using small, secret, and rapid strikes.This struggle for supplies led to one British success and several Patriot successes in a series of nearly bloodless conflicts known as the Powder Alarms.By the rude bridge that arched the flood, Their flag to April's breeze unfurled, Here once the embattled farmers stood, And fired the shot heard round the world.

Gage's plan was to avoid conflict by removing military supplies from Whig militias using small, secret, and rapid strikes.This struggle for supplies led to one British success and several Patriot successes in a series of nearly bloodless conflicts known as the Powder Alarms.By the rude bridge that arched the flood, Their flag to April's breeze unfurled, Here once the embattled farmers stood, And fired the shot heard round the world.

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General Thomas Gage was the military governor of Massachusetts and commander-in-chief of the roughly 3,000 British military forces garrisoned in Boston.

He had no control over Massachusetts outside of Boston, however, where implementation of the Acts had increased tensions between the Patriot Whig majority and the pro-British Tory minority.

Fortunately, thanks to a rather elaborate colonial intelligence network, led by the Sons of Liberty, the Patriots were aware that their supplies were at risk, and were able to move them to different locations long before the British began to move.

Also, thanks to the daring rides of a few brave men, the colonial militia knew that an engagement with the British Army was imminent.

In late 1774, Colonial leaders adopted the Suffolk Resolves in resistance to the alterations made to the Massachusetts colonial government by the British parliament following the Boston Tea Party.

The colonial assembly responded by forming a Patriot provisional government known as the Massachusetts Provincial Congress and calling for local militias to train for possible hostilities.Although in recent history, the term "Shot Heard Round the World" is attached to the game-winning home run by New York Giants outfielder Bobby Thomson to win the National League Pennant in 1951, and synonymous with the shot that killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand at the beginning of World War I, Emerson did not write this famous ode to baseball, nor did he live to see the wars of the Twentieth Century.Instead, he penned these few lines about the famous Battles of Lexington and Concord, the first official engagement between Britain and the Colonies in the American Revolutionary War.The British Army's infantry was nicknamed "redcoats" and sometimes "devils" by the colonists.They had occupied Boston since 1768 and had been augmented by naval forces and marines to enforce what the colonists called The Intolerable Acts, which had been passed by the British Parliament to punish the Province of Massachusetts Bay for the Boston Tea Party and other acts of defiance.Specifically, Emerson's poem describes the first shots fired by Patriots at the North Bridge in what is now Charlestown, in northwestern Boston, Massachusetts.The clash began on April 19, 1775 when more about 700 British soldiers were given what they thought were secret orders to destroy colonial military supplies in Concord, Massachusetts.While the British were searching, the American militia was able to reform, and they met the enemy at the North Bridge in Concord, and they were successful this time in driving the British back.As more American reinforcements arrived, they forced the British army south to Boston, and the militias blockaded the narrow land accesses to Charlestown and Boston, starting the Siege of Boston.The British forces began their return march to Boston after completing their search for military supplies, and more militiamen continued to arrive from neighboring towns. Smith's expedition was rescued by reinforcements under Brigadier General Hugh Percy, a future duke of Northumberland styled at this time by the courtesy title Earl Percy.Gunfire erupted again between the two sides and continued throughout the day as the regulars marched back towards Boston. The combined force of about 1,700 men marched back to Boston under heavy fire in a tactical withdrawal and eventually reached the safety of Charlestown.

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